Download Henry Watterson and the New South PDF

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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 13: 9780813124179
Total Pages : 362 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (241 users)

Read and Download Daniel Margolies book Henry Watterson and the New South in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book THenry Watterson and the New South. This book was released on 2006-11-24 with total page 362 pages. Book excerpt: Henry Watterson (1840–1921), editor of the Louisville Courier-Journal from the 1860s through WWI, was one of the most important and widely read newspaper editors in American history. An influential New South supporter of sectional reconciliation and economic development, Watterson was also the nation’s premier advocate of free trade and globalization. Watterson’s vision of a prosperous and independent South within an expanding American empire was unique among prominent Southerners and Democrats. He helped articulate the bipartisan embrace of globalization that accompanied America’s rise to unmatched prosperity and world power. Daniel S. Margolies restores Watterson to his place at the heart of late nineteenth-century southern and American history by combining biographical narrative with an evaluation of Watterson’s unique involvement in the politics of free trade and globalization.

Download Henry Watterson and the New South PDF

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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 13: 0813138523
Total Pages : 352 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (131 users)

Read and Download Daniel S. Margolies book Henry Watterson and the New South in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book THenry Watterson and the New South. This book was released on 2006-11-24 with total page 352 pages. Book excerpt: Henry Watterson, editor of the Louisville Courier-Journal during the tumultuous decades between the Civil War and World War I, was one of the most influential and widely read journalists in American history. At the height of his fame in the early twentieth century, Watterson was so well known that his name and image were used to sell cigars and whiskey. A major player in American politics for more than fifty years, Watterson personally knew nearly every president from Andrew Jackson to Woodrow Wilson. Though he always refused to run, the renowned editor was frequently touted as a candidate for the U.S. Senate, the Kentucky governor's office, and even the White House. Shortly after his arrival in Louisville in 1868, Watterson merged competing interests and formed the Courier-Journal, quickly establishing it as the paper of record in Kentucky, a central promoter of economic development in the New South, and a prominent voice on the national political stage. An avowed Democrat in an era when newspapers were openly aligned with political parties, Watterson adopted a defiant independence within the Democratic Party and challenged the Democrats' consensus opinions as much as he reinforced them. In the first new study of Watterson's historical significance in more than fifty years, Daniel S. Margolies traces the development of Watterson's political and economic positions and his transformation from a strident Confederate newspaper editor into an admirer of Lincoln, a powerful voice of sectional reconciliation, and the nation's premier advocate of free trade. Henry Watterson and the New South provides the first study of Watterson's unique attempt to guide regional and national discussions of foreign affairs. Margolies details Watterson's quest to solve the sovereignty problems of the 1870s and to quell the economic and social upheavals of the 1890s through an expansive empire of free trade. Watterson's political and editorial contemporaries variously advocated free silverism, protectionism, and isolationism, but he rejected their narrow focus and maintained that the best way to improve the South's fortunes was to expand its economic activities to a truly global scale. Watterson's New Departure in foreign affairs was an often contradictory program of decentralized home rule and overseas imperialism, but he remained steadfast in his vision of a prosperous and independent South within an American economic empire of unfettered free trade. Watterson thus helped to bring about the eventual bipartisan embrace of globalization that came to define America's relationship with the rest of the world in the twentieth century. Margolies's groundbreaking analysis shows how Watterson's authoritative command of the nation's most divisive issues, his rhetorical zeal, and his willingness to stand against the tide of conventional wisdom made him a national icon.

Download Visual Art and the Urban Evolution of the New South PDF

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Publisher : Univ of South Carolina Press
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ISBN 13: 1611174333
Total Pages : 400 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (111 users)

Read and Download Deborah C. Pollack book Visual Art and the Urban Evolution of the New South in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book TVisual Art and the Urban Evolution of the New South. This book was released on 2015-01-18 with total page 400 pages. Book excerpt: Visual Art and the Urban Evolution of the New South recounts the enormous influence of artists in the evolution of six southern cities—Atlanta, Charleston, New Orleans, Louisville, Austin, and Miami—from 1865 to 1950. In the decades following the Civil War, painters, sculptors, photographers, and illustrators in these municipalities employed their talents to articulate concepts of the New South, aestheticism, and Gilded Age opulence and to construct a visual culture far beyond providing pretty pictures in public buildings and statues in city squares. As Deborah C. Pollack investigates New South proponents such as Henry W. Grady of Atlanta and other regional leaders, she identifies “cultural strivers”—philanthropists, women’s organizations, entrepreneurs, writers, architects, politicians, and dreamers—who united with visual artists to champion the arts both as a means of cultural preservation and as mechanisms of civic progress. Aestheticism, made popular by Oscar Wilde’s southern tours during the Gilded Age, was another driving force in art creation and urban improvement. Specific art works occasionally precipitated controversy and incited public anger, yet for the most part artists of all kinds were recognized as providing inspirational incentives for self-improvement, civic enhancement and tourism, art appreciation, and personal fulfillment through the love of beauty. Each of the six New South cities entered the late nineteenth century with fractured artistic heritages. Charleston and Atlanta had to recover from wartime devastation. The infrastructures of New Orleans and Louisville were barely damaged by war, but their social underpinnings were shattered by the end of slavery and postwar economic depression. Austin was not vitalized until after the Civil War and Miami was a post–Civil War creation. Pollack surveys these New South cities with an eye to understanding how each locale shaped its artistic and aesthetic self-perception across a spectrum of economic, political, gender, and race issues. She also discusses Lost Cause imagery, present in all the studied municipalities While many art history volumes concerning the South focus on sultry landscapes outside the urban grid, Visual Art and the Urban Evolution of the New South explores the art belonging to its cities, whether exhibited in its museums, expositions, and galleries, or reflective of its parks, plazas, marketplaces, industrial areas, gardens, and universities. It also identifies and celebrates the creative urban humanity who shaped the cultural, social, and, at times, architectural framework for the modern southern city.

Download Partisans of the Southern Press PDF

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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 13: 0813194113
Total Pages : 288 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (131 users)

Read and Download Carl R. Osthaus book Partisans of the Southern Press in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book TPartisans of the Southern Press. This book was released on 2021-12-14 with total page 288 pages. Book excerpt: Carl R. Osthaus examines the southern contribution to American Press history, from Thomas Ritchie's mastery of sectional politics and the New Orleans Picayune's popular voice and use of local color, to the emergence of progressive New South editors Henry Watterson, Francis Dawson, and Henry Grady, who imitated, as far as possible, the New Journalism of the 1880s. Unlike black and reform editors who spoke for minorities and the poor, the South's mainstream editors of the nineteenth century advanced the interests of the elite and helped create the myth of southern unity. The southern press diverged from national standards in the years of sectionalism, Civil War, and Reconstruction. Addicted to editorial diatribes rather than to news gathering, these southern editors of the middle period were violent, partisan, and vindictive. They exemplified and defended freedom of the press, but the South's press was free only because southern society was closed. This work broadens our understanding of journalism of the South, while making a valuable contribution to southern history.

Download A New History of Kentucky PDF

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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 13: 0813176506
Total Pages : 614 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (131 users)

Read and Download James C. Klotter book A New History of Kentucky in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book TA New History of Kentucky. This book was released on 2018-11-26 with total page 614 pages. Book excerpt: When originally published, A New History of Kentucky provided a comprehensive study of the Commonwealth, bringing it to life by revealing the many faces, deep traditions, and historical milestones of the state. With new discoveries and findings, the narrative continues to evolve, and so does the telling of Kentucky's rich history. In this second edition, authors James C. Klotter and Craig Thompson Friend provide significantly revised content with updated material on gender politics, African American history, and cultural history. This wide-ranging volume includes a full overview of the state and its economic, educational, environmental, racial, and religious histories. At its essence, Kentucky's story is about its people -- not just the notable and prominent figures but also lesser-known and sometimes overlooked personalities. The human spirit unfolds through the lives of individuals such as Shawnee peace chief Nonhelema Hokolesqua and suffrage leader Madge Breckinridge, early land promoter John Filson, author Wendell Berry, and Iwo Jima flag--raiser Private Franklin Sousley. They lived on a landscape defined by its topography as much as its political boundaries, from Appalachia in the east to the Jackson Purchase in the west, and from the Walker Line that forms the Commonwealth's southern boundary to the Ohio River that shapes its northern boundary. Along the journey are traces of Kentucky's past -- its literary and musical traditions, its state-level and national political leadership, and its basketball and bourbon. Yet this volume also faces forthrightly the Commonwealth's blemishes -- the displacement of Native Americans, African American enslavement, the legacy of violence, and failures to address poverty and poor health. A New History of Kentucky ranges throughout all parts of the Commonwealth to explore its special meaning to those who have called it home. It is a broadly interpretive, all-encompassing narrative that tells Kentucky's complex, extensive, and ever-changing story.

Download New Women of the New South PDF

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 13: 0195359577
Total Pages : 320 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (953 users)

Read and Download Marjorie Spruill Wheeler book New Women of the New South in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book TNew Women of the New South. This book was released on 1993-07-01 with total page 320 pages. Book excerpt: There is currently a great deal of interest in the Southern suffrage movement, but until now historians have had no comprehensive history of the woman suffrage movement in the South, the region where suffragists had the hardest fight and the least success. This important new book focuses on eleven of the movement's most prominent leaders at the regional and national levels, exploring the range of opinions within this group, with particular emphasis on race and states' rights. Wheeler insists that the suffragists were motivated primarily by the desire to secure public affirmation of female equality and to protect the interests of women, children, and the poor in the tradition of noblesse oblige in a New South they perceived as misgoverned by crass and materialistic men. A vigorous suffrage movement began in the South in the 1890s, however, because suffragists believed offering woman suffrage as a way of countering black voting strength gave them an "expediency" argument that would succeed--even make the South lead the nation in the adoption of woman suffrage. When this strategy failed, the movement flagged, until the Progressive Movement provided a new rationale for female enfranchisement. Wheeler also emphasizes the relationship between the Northern and Southern leaders, which was one of mutual influence. This pioneering study of the Southern suffrage movement will be essential to students of the history of woman suffrage, American women, the South, the Progressive Era, and American reform movements.

Download The Rise of the Urban South PDF

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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 13: 0813194741
Total Pages : 232 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (131 users)

Read and Download Lawrence H. Larsen book The Rise of the Urban South in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book TThe Rise of the Urban South. This book was released on 2021-12-14 with total page 232 pages. Book excerpt: Operating under an outmoded system of urban development and faced by the vicissitudes of the Civil War and Reconstruction, southerners in the nineteenth century built a network of cities that met the needs of their society. In this pioneering exploration of that intricate story, Lawrence H. Larsen shows that in the antebellum period, southern entrepreneurs built cities in layers to facilitate the movement of cotton. First came the colonial cities, followed by those of the piedmont, the New West, the Gulf Coast, and the interior. By the Civil War, cotton could move by a combination of road, rail, and river through a network of cities—for example, from Jackson to Memphis to New Orleans to Europe. In the Gilded Age, building on past practices, the South continued to make urban gains. Men like Henry Grady of Atlanta and Henry Watterson of Louisville used broader regional objectives to promote their own cities. Grady successfully sold Atlanta, one of the most southern of cities demographically, as a city with a northern outlook; Watterson tied Louisville to national goals in railroad building. The New South movement did not succeed in bringing the region to parity with the rest of the nation, yet the South continued to rise along older lines. By 1900, far from being a failure in terms of the general course of American development, the South had created an urban system suited to its needs, while avoiding the promotional frenzy that characterized the building of cities in the North. Based upon federal and local sources, this book will become the standard work on nineteenth-century southern urbanization, a subject too long unexplored.

Download Madeline McDowell Breckinridge and the Battle for a New South PDF

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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 13: 0813139147
Total Pages : 363 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (131 users)

Read and Download Melba Porter Hay book Madeline McDowell Breckinridge and the Battle for a New South in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book TMadeline McDowell Breckinridge and the Battle for a New South. This book was released on 2009-04-24 with total page 363 pages. Book excerpt: A biography of the Kentucky women’s rights activist and progressive reformer, featuring personal interviews and recently discovered correspondence. Preeminent Kentucky reformer and women’s rights advocate Madeline McDowell Breckinridge (1872-1920) was at the forefront of social change during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. A descendant of Henry Clay and the daughter of two of Kentucky’s most prominent families, Breckinridge had a remarkably varied activist career that included roles in the promotion of public health, education, women’s rights, and charity. Founder of the Lexington Civic League and Associated Charities, Breckinridge successfully lobbied to create parks and playgrounds and to establish a juvenile court system in Kentucky. She also became president of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, served as vice president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, and even campaigned across the country for the League of Nations. In the first biography of Breckinridge since 1921, Melba Porter Hay draws on newly discovered correspondence and rich personal interviews with her female associates to illuminate the fascinating life of this important Kentucky activist. Deftly balancing Breckinridge’s public reform efforts with her private concerns, Hay tells the story of Madeline’s marriage to Desha Breckinridge, editor of the Lexington Herald, and how she used the match to her advantage by promoting social causes in the newspaper. Hay also chronicles Breckinridge’s ordeals with tuberculosis and amputation, and emotionally trying episodes of family betrayal and sex scandals. Hay describes how Breckinridge’s physical struggles and personal losses transformed her from a privileged socialite into a selfless advocate for the disadvantaged. Later as vice president of the National American Women Suffrage Association, Breckinridge lobbied for Kentucky’s ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, which gave women the right to vote in 1920. While devoting much of her life to the woman suffrage movement on the local and national levels, she also supported the antituberculosis movement, social programs for the poor, compulsory school attendance, and laws regulating child labor. In bringing to life this extraordinary reformer, Hay shows how Breckinridge championed Kentucky’s social development during the Progressive Era. Praise for Madeline McDowell Breckinridge and the Battle for a New South “An important contribution to American history, one that is of special significance to Kentucky history, the Progressive Era, and the women's rights movement.” —Paul Fuller, author of Laura Clay and the Women’s Rights Movement “Hay brings to life a multi-dimensional woman, emblematic of her times, with whom readers can identify and sympathize.” —Melanie Beals Goan, author of Mary Breckinridge: The Frontier Nursing Service and Rural Health in Appalachia

Download Oratory in the New South PDF

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Publisher : LSU Press
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ISBN 13: 9780807125168
Total Pages : 304 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (251 users)

Read and Download Waldo W. Braden book Oratory in the New South in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book TOratory in the New South. This book was released on 1999-03-01 with total page 304 pages. Book excerpt: The thirty years prior to the Civil War were flamboyant and fiery times for the South. People had a passion for political issues and an ear for the lusty oratory that could be heard at any gathering, social or political. In Oratory in the Old South, Waldo Braden and his associates looked past the popular myths of that era and uncovered the true nature of the oratory of the times.In this sequel to that earlier volume, Braden and seven other speech scholars examine the oratory of accommodation that dominated the southern forum in the post-Civil War years. Speakers of this era, they find, had to overcome problems of spirit and morale; their challenge was to build up the political and personal confidence of a people who were defeated. By the same token, these speakers had to adapt their oratory to outside influences that had the power to exert military pressure, withhold funds, and employ negative political coercion. The eight essays of the book are developed topically, and the issues of racism, women's rights, states' rights, industrialization, and education are delineated as they weave into the developing story of the New South. Among the topics dealt with are the promotion of cultural myths, the tactics of Henry W. Grady as a propagandist for the New South, the oratory of the United Confederate Veterans, and the emergence of women as speakers for reform.The oft-repeated myths and encouragements of the orators helped giver southerners the distinction they thought lost, a sense of nationalism. Once created, this cohesive regionalism wrought a power, pride, and prestige so strong that they defied challenge and made many southerners impervious to change and progress until well after 1950. Oratory in the New South reveals many sources of the South's modern self-concept and stands as a unique account of this formative period.

Download Religion, Race, and the Making of Confederate Kentucky, 1830-1880 PDF

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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 13: 1107000890
Total Pages : 257 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (7 users)

Read and Download Luke E. Harlow book Religion, Race, and the Making of Confederate Kentucky, 1830-1880 in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book TReligion, Race, and the Making of Confederate Kentucky, 1830-1880. This book was released on 2014-04-21 with total page 257 pages. Book excerpt: This book places religious debates about slavery at the centre of American political culture before, during and after the Civil War.

Download The New Cambridge History of American Foreign Relations PDF

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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 13: 0521767520
Total Pages : 272 pages
Rating : 4.5/5 (217 users)

Read and Download William Earl Weeks book The New Cambridge History of American Foreign Relations in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book TThe New Cambridge History of American Foreign Relations. This book was released on 2013-04-08 with total page 272 pages. Book excerpt: This second volume of the updated edition describes the dynamics of United States foreign policy from 1865 to 1913.

Download The New Cambridge History of American Foreign Relations: Volume 2, The American Search for Opportunity, 1865–1913 PDF

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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 13: 1316175634
Total Pages : pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (161 users)

Read and Download Walter LaFeber book The New Cambridge History of American Foreign Relations: Volume 2, The American Search for Opportunity, 1865–1913 in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book TThe New Cambridge History of American Foreign Relations: Volume 2, The American Search for Opportunity, 1865–1913. This book was released on 2013-04-08 with total page pages. Book excerpt: Since their first publication, the four volumes of the Cambridge History of American Foreign Relations have served as the definitive source for the topic, from the colonial period to the Cold War. This second volume of the updated edition describes the causes and dynamics of United States foreign policy from 1865 to 1913, the era when the United States became one of the four great world powers and the world's greatest economic power. The dramatic expansion of global power during this period was set in motion by the strike-ridden, bloody, economic depression from 1873 to 1897 when American farms and factories began seeking overseas markets for their surplus goods, as well as by a series of foreign policy triumphs, as America extended its authority to Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Panama Canal Zone, Central America, the Philippines and China. Ironically, as Americans searched for opportunity and stability abroad, they helped create revolutions in Central America, Panama, the Philippines, Mexico, China and Russia.

Download The New South Creed PDF

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Publisher : NewSouth Books
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ISBN 13: 1603061444
Total Pages : 312 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (3 users)

Read and Download Paul M. Gaston book The New South Creed in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book TThe New South Creed. This book was released on 2011-06-01 with total page 312 pages. Book excerpt: First published in 1970, The New South Creed has lost none of its usefulness to anyone examining the dream of a "New South" -- prosperous, powerful, racially harmonious -- that developed in the three decades after the Civil War, and the transformation of that dream into widely accepted myths, shielding and perpetuating a conservative, racist society. Many young moderates of the period created a philosophy designed to enrich the region -- attempting to both restore the power and prestige and to lay the race question to rest. In spite of these men and their efforts, their dream of a New South joined the Antebellum illusion as a genuine social myth, with a controlling power over the way in which their followers, in both North and South, perceived reality.

Download Away Down South PDF

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 13: 0195315812
Total Pages : 417 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (953 users)

Read and Download James Charles Cobb book Away Down South in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book TAway Down South. This book was released on 2007 with total page 417 pages. Book excerpt: In this unique synthesis of political, cultural, and intellectual history, James C. Cobb spans more than two centuries in tracing the origins and development of the South as not just an exception to the national rule, but as an internal 'other' against which American nationhood was defined.

Download Appalachia in the Making PDF

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Publisher : Univ of North Carolina Press
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ISBN 13: 0807888966
Total Pages : 402 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (78 users)

Read and Download Mary Beth Pudup book Appalachia in the Making in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book TAppalachia in the Making. This book was released on 2000-11-09 with total page 402 pages. Book excerpt: Appalachia first entered the American consciousness as a distinct region in the decades following the Civil War. The place and its people have long been seen as backwards and 'other' because of their perceived geographical, social, and economic isolation. These essays, by fourteen eminent historians and social scientists, illuminate important dimensions of early social life in diverse sections of the Appalachian mountains. The contributors seek to place the study of Appalachia within the context of comparative regional studies of the United States, maintaining that processes and patterns thought to make the region exceptional were not necessarily unique to the mountain South. The contributors are Mary K. Anglin, Alan Banks, Dwight B. Billings, Kathleen M. Blee, Wilma A. Dunaway, John R. Finger, John C. Inscoe, Ronald L. Lewis, Ralph Mann, Gordon B. McKinney, Mary Beth Pudup, Paul Salstrom, Altina L. Waller, and John Alexander Williams

Download Kentucky and the Great War PDF

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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 13: 0813168031
Total Pages : 431 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (131 users)

Read and Download David J. Bettez book Kentucky and the Great War in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book TKentucky and the Great War. This book was released on 2016-10-07 with total page 431 pages. Book excerpt: The award-winning author of Kentucky Marine “has crafted an excellent account of how World War I impacted Kentucky socially, economically, and politically” (Journal of America’s Military Past). From five thousand children marching in a parade, singing, “Johnnie get your hoe . . . Mary dig your row,” to communities banding together to observe Meatless Tuesdays and Wheatless Wednesdays, Kentuckians were loyal supporters of their country during the First World War. Kentucky had one of the lowest rates of draft dodging in the nation, and the state increased its coal production by 50 percent during the war years. Overwhelmingly, the people of the Commonwealth set aside partisan interests and worked together to help the nation achieve victory in Europe. David J. Bettez provides the first comprehensive analysis of the impact of the Great War on Bluegrass society, politics, economy, and culture, contextualizing the state’s involvement within the national experience. His exhaustively researched study examines the Kentucky Council of Defense—which sponsored local war-effort activities—military mobilization and preparation, opposition and dissent, and the role of religion and higher education in shaping the state’s response to the war. It also describes the efforts of Kentuckians who served abroad in military and civilian capacities, and postwar memorialization of their contributions. Kentucky and the Great War explores the impact of the conflict on women’s suffrage, child labor, and African American life. In particular, Bettez investigates how black citizens were urged to support a war to make the world “safe for democracy” even as their civil rights and freedoms were violated in the Jim Crow South. This engaging and timely social history offers new perspectives on an overlooked aspect of World War I.

Download The Dunning School PDF

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Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
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ISBN 13: 0813142725
Total Pages : 338 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (131 users)

Read and Download John David Smith book The Dunning School in PDF, EPub, Mobi, Kindle online. Free book TThe Dunning School. This book was released on 2013-11-15 with total page 338 pages. Book excerpt: From the late nineteenth century until World War I, a group of Columbia University students gathered under the mentorship of the renowned historian William Archibald Dunning (1857--1922). Known as the Dunning School, these students wrote the first generation of state studies on the Reconstruction -- volumes that generally sympathized with white southerners, interpreted radical Reconstruction as a mean-spirited usurpation of federal power, and cast the Republican Party as a coalition of carpetbaggers, freedmen, scalawags, and former Unionists. Edited by the award-winning historian John David Smith and J. Vincent Lowery, The Dunning School focuses on this controversial group of historians and its scholarly output. Despite their methodological limitations and racial bias, the Dunning historians' writings prefigured the sources and questions that later historians of the Reconstruction would utilize and address. Many of their pioneering dissertations remain important to ongoing debates on the broad meaning of the Civil War and Reconstruction and the evolution of American historical scholarship. This groundbreaking collection of original essays offers a fair and critical assessment of the Dunning School that focuses on the group's purpose, the strengths and weaknesses of its constituents, and its legacy. Squaring the past with the present, this important book also explores the evolution of historical interpretations over time and illuminates the ways in which contemporary political, racial, and social questions shape historical analyses.